N. Euclid “Neighborway” and FAQ

Image shows a map with the project limits and location of traffic circles. Additionally, there is a picture of the pilot traffic circle with someone using it.

The Department of Mobility and Infrastructure (DOMI), in an effort to provide low-stress connectivity through the neighborhoods of Highland Park and East Liberty, is proposing a Neighborway on N Euclid Avenue from Bunkerhill Street to Station Street. This is part of the City’s MoveForwardPGH Program.

LATEST:

Feedback and Outreach

  • Notices on City’s website
  • Presented at Highland Park Community Council April 16 monthly meeting
  • Published an article in the Highland Park Community Council newsletter
  • Mailers sent to all addresses within project scope.
  • June 24: DOMI held an online public meeting (recording here) to go over the specifics of the project, answer questions, and provide feedback. You can view the presentation slides here
  • July 9-21: Miovision camera and Speed Data collection
  • July 10-28: Field Visits with: DPW Snow Plows (7/10), Bureau of Fire (7/17), Neighborhood Walk with neighbors/Councilwoman Gross (7/17), Pittsburgh Public Schools (7/21), ADA Focus Group (7/27), and Port Authority (7/28). Here is a summary of the Pilot results and meetings.
  • July 30: DOMI held an online public meeting (recording here) to go over the specifics of the project, answer questions, and provide feedback. You can view the presentation slides here.  
  • See the Project Fact Sheet here.
  • We encourage you to submit feedback about this project by submitting to our webform.
  • You can find more information on all of DOMI’s upcoming projects here: pittsburghpa.gov/domi/current-projects

Responding to concerns from the community members, and verified with speed and crash data, the project looks to create a low-speed route that will increase safety for everyone who travels or lives along the route. Euclid sees approximately 1,700 cars per day, and there have been a significant number of crashes recorded, with over half due to aggressive driving. 

Additionally, N Euclid was identified in the City’s new Bike(+) Plan as a key corridor to provide better connectivity toward a citywide bike network. The Neighborway would connect to the URA’s upcoming Penn Circle two-way conversion project, which includes bike lanes, as well as community assets such as the Bryant St and East Liberty business districts, Highland Park, Fulton elementary, the Barack Obama academy, Peabody Park, Borland Garden, and Garland Parklet. 

A Neighborway is the newest type of street in Pittsburgh. It’s a street, or series of connected streets, where motor vehicle speeds and volumes are kept low by using a variety of traffic-calming techniques. The idea is to make travel more comfortable for existing residents, while also making it safer to walk, ride a bike, and for kids to play. 

Neighborways are intended for low-volume residential streets to discourage drivers from using the street as a cut-through and assure that local motor vehicle traffic travels at safe speeds for streets that will not include dedicated space for bicyclists (like bike lanes), but are still in need of traffic calming measures. Neighborways are used as a tactic to reduce travel speeds, encourage non-motorized travel, and have a minimal impact on parking. 

Pittsburgh’s first Neighborway is located in the South Side, on a series of streets that parallel E Carson St. It includes speed humps and a new bike/pedestrian ramp under the Birmingham Bridge. However, as each Neighborway is unique and responds to local traffic conditions, speed humps are not being proposed for North Euclid. 

The primary feature of DOMI’s proposal for the North Euclid Neighborway is a series of neighborhood traffic circles. The route will also include wayfinding signage, bump outs, and other traffic calming measures where appropriate. N Euclid is a perfect fit for this project as it offers an alternative to busy Highland and N Negley Avenues. DOMI is planning to pilot some elements of this project with temporary materials for one month prior to permanent installation, and they will be accepting comments during this time. 

FAQs

What is MoveForwardPGH?

MoveForwardPGH is a collaborative program between the City’s Department of Mobility and Infrastructure (DOMI), Bike Pittsburgh, and Healthy Ride to help rapidly implement the new Bike(+) Plan, as well as market how less stressful roadways are beneficial for everyone, regardless of how they use our streets. See the https://moveforwardpgh.org/ website for more information.

Why N Euclid?

Map of the Highland Park existing and proposed bicycle network. Graph showing volume of traffic vs. speed and what type of bike infrastructure treatment is suggested. Both from the Bike(+) Plan.
Map of the Highland Park existing and proposed bicycle network. Graph showing volume of traffic vs. speed and what type of bike infrastructure treatment is suggested. Both from the Bike(+) Plan.

Responding to concerns from the community members, and verified with speed and crash data, the project looks to create a low-speed route that will increase safety for everyone who travels or lives along the route. Euclid sees approximately 1,700 cars per day, and we have recorded a significant number of crashes, with over half due to aggressive driving. Additionally, N Euclid was identified in the City’s new Bike(+) Plan as a key corridor to provide better connectivity toward a citywide bike network, neighborhood business districts, community assets, and the upcoming Penn Circle two-way conversion (URA project). 

Can you explain the pilot project and how long it will last?

While Neighborhood Traffic Circles may be new to Pittsburgh, they have been in use all over the country for decades. We would like the opportunity to first put up temporary installations (made with flex posts and signs) so that we can monitor their effectiveness both in person and with video cameras, collect data and feedback, and meet with stakeholders like the Port Authority, neighbors, businesses and community groups. 

 

On July 8, crews installed the pilot Neighborhood Traffic Circles on Euclid

We anticipate that the pilot will be up for approximately a month. We will be making sure that they achieve our outcomes of slower speeds, safer intersections, and reducing the total number of motor vehicles on the street. The finalized traffic circles will be made of concrete with landscaping in the middle to help beautify the street. Click here to find out more about the Pilot phase of the project.

Will street parking be affected?

We have no plans to remove any legal parking spaces.

Will the Stop Signs be removed? 

The stop signs will be replaced with yield signs. Seattle, the city with the most experience in Neighborhood Traffic Circles, has been installing them since the 90s without the use of stop signs or yield signs. We will be using yield signs here in Pittsburgh, because Neighborhood Traffic Circles are new to Pittsburgh, and because we have heard people’s concerns. 

What is the timeline of the project?

We would like to install the temporary pilot in July 2020, monitor it for about a month, then install the permanent circles after that.

Why aren’t speed humps being proposed?

While the speed data showed that a large number of drivers were indeed speeding on N Euclid, the speeds were not high enough to justify speed humps.

Will the neighborhood traffic circles prevent Emergency Vehicles, garbage trucks or moving trucks from accessing N Euclid St?

No. First of all, most emergency vehicles take the closest arterial road, not residential streets to get close to their destination. Once on the street, there will be no access issues. The concrete circles are made with a “mountable curb” meaning that larger trucks can easily drive over them if they need to. We don’t anticipate this being a problem, as we are designing them so that buses can get around the circles without issue. Additionally, we are working with the Public Safety Department during the planning and monitoring process as well.

Will the traffic circles be ADA compliant?

Yes. This treatment has been used in cities across the country for years with positive results. The project will not touch the sidewalks themselves, although we may extend the curb/sidewalk into the street in key locations. The goal is to improve safety for all modes, including pedestrians and people with mobility concerns. We are working with the City-County Task Force on Disabilities as well as the City’s ADA Coordinator on the project.

What is the cost of the project?

The total project cost is approximately $180K, which relatively speaking, is a very small amount within the City’s transportation budget. The costs can be broken up into three parts: 1. Planning, funded from the operating budget; 2. Design, funded via grants; 3. Construction, funded by the Capital Budget, which provides the match to the grant. 

How will the project affect buses?

Please note that Port Authority operations are determined by the Port Authority. The project itself will not affect buses. We are working with the Port Authority and the design will be able to accommodate their use. It’s worth noting that many of Pittsburgh’s pedestrian crashes are people accessing transit, so we hope that making it safer for pedestrians will make transit more attractive. 

Do you have a plan to educate the community on how best drive, walk and ride through traffic circles?

We have information about traffic circles in general on the City’s website, as well as the MoveForwardPGH website. While we feel that the yield and “keep right” signs should be enough for people to understand, additional temporary and permanent signage will be included with the pilot and permanent installation. Additionally, during the pilot phase, be on the lookout for our city planners and engineers on location monitoring the installation where they will be able explain the new layout.

Won’t this just push vehicles onto other streets?

From the available studies and experiences, other cities have not seen this occur. However, we will continue to monitor how the changes affect traffic patterns and look for ways to mitigate if necessary. Here are some links to a few studies to get you started if you’d like to research further. (FHWA), (Seattle), (Arlington)

How have you communicated with residents about this project?

Communication will be ongoing, particularly during the pilot phase. So far, we have sent mailers to all addresses within the project scope, put notices on the City’s website, and published an article in the Highland Park Community Group newsletter. Additionally, we hosted an online public meeting, and have had conversations with stakeholders and residents, and have presented at the virtual monthly meetings of several community groups, such as HPCC.

If you have further questions, email:

moveforwardpgh@gmail.com